Biden Says No Student Loan Payments Until October

 As I've written before, I believed that Joe Biden always had some plan in place to delay student loan repayments and extend the 0% interest and 0 payment forbearance period. The biggest surprise is that student loan payments don't start up again until October. That means, a borrower with only federal student loans will not have had to make a payment for 19 months. That's insane and borderline irresponsible by the Biden administration, which is why I'm predicting he has more announcements ahead. I fully expected student loan forbearance to be extended through the winter and into the spring of 2021, then possibly extended again depending on the status of the coronavirus pandemic, but jumping all the way to October hints at more widespread changes to the student loan landscape. 

Creator: Alex Wong Credit: Getty Images
Copyright: 2021 Getty Images

First, it buys the Biden administration time to develop their own plan around student loans. I fully expect the Biden administration to mirror some of the changes we saw during the Obama administration, which expanded some of the income-driven repayment plans that qualify for eventual federal student loan forgiveness. I see similar changes coming from Biden by October. It affords him just enough time to propose and implement changes, while allowing borrowers time to plan ahead for their upcoming payments. 

Second, the extended period of forbearance will strengthen the support that Joe Biden has from those with federal student loans who've grown accustomed to not making student loan payments. Those not making student loan payments will have had ample time to live beyond their means which will further the outcry for some sort of adjustment to the student loan payments. It could be as simple as student loan forbearance resembling the mortgage loan forbearance in place today, where a phone call is all that's needed or could be as foundational as decreasing the maximum payment due each month. Right now payments are generally capped at 10% of the borrowers discretionary income. For example, a discretionary income of $50,000 equates to a monthly payment of $416. Understanding that most people live right up to or beyond their means (even though they shouldn't), an extra $416 a month could be hard to come by for many people who haven't made a student loan payment in over a year. For that reason, I think the future student loan payments could be capped closer to 5%-7.5% of a borrowers discretionary income. In the earlier example, that comes out to $208-$312 a month, which is much more manageable. 

Creator: Pool Credit: Getty Images
Copyright: 2021 Getty Images

Last, there will be some sort of immediate student loan forgiveness. This part is by far the murkiest. Student loan forgiveness already exists today in the form of 10 year and 20 or 25 year forgiveness after making the qualified income-driven repayments. The difference here is that the forgiveness would be immediate, and there would be no sense of "earning it" through years of repayment, which softens the blow for many who elected not to go that route. 

The difficult part is that the spectrum for potential student loan forgiveness is vast and ranges from $10,000 to complete forgiveness for all federal student loans with a presidential executive order. I wouldn't get too excited about total student loan forgiveness though, unless there is some solution for those who've already paid off their education, it likely isn't happening. The public outcry would simply be too large from those who would feel cheated (understandably so) by doing the fiscally responsible thing and paying down their student loan balance or paying for their education ahead of time. 

Creator: JIM WATSON Credit: AFP via Getty Images

I think the most likely solution is some sort of small forgiveness, in the $10,000-$50,000 range for all borrowers with federal student loan debt under a certain annual income. It's as simple as distributing the stimulus checks, and would make a significant impact on borrowers with a moderate amount of debt, but considerably low incomes. The next resolution is likely capping the student loan repayment for all federal borrowers at 20 years of repayment for those in the private sector, and 10 years of repayment for those at a non-profit organization (with drastically higher approval rates for those that apply for 10 year forgiveness) regardless of the income-driven repayment plan. No application will be due for those after 20 years of repayments as payments will simply cease and the tax bill at the end will be removed, to align it with the10 year forgiveness in a non-profit. 

These slight changes to the current system would be a good first step in what needs to be a nearly complete overhaul of education in the U.S. and will provide a large enough cushion for borrowers to justify the ever increasing costs of school, while not feeling buried by a mountain of student loan debt that they'll never be able to repay. The one thing I am certain of is that the Biden administration picked a September 30th end date for a reason. I guess we'll just have to wait and see.

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